A R T / portfolio

Mask off: an understanding of slavery thru black fem bodies

The Beginnin'
The Beginnin'

January 2020. 11x17, digital-Procreate

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Enuf Tears to Outweigh the Ocean
Enuf Tears to Outweigh the Ocean

January 2020. 11x17, digital-Procreate

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The Moon Kno the Language of Violence
The Moon Kno the Language of Violence

January 2020. 11x17, digital-Procreate

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Sugar is Yt Gold
Sugar is Yt Gold

January 2020. 11x17, digital-Procreate

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Tea Plantation

“History prefers women.” I said this after reading Circe, by Madeline Miller, who tells the story Circe, strange daughter of Helios, the sun god. Though narration—from textbooks to personal journals- often left out is the perspective of women. And in that, there is a richness there that can not be disputed when that perspective is given space to be understood. In a course I took in my undergrad at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, I studied under Chrissy Clark-Pujara, a historian and author of Dark Work: The Business of Slavery in Rhode Island. She taught her class in a style where we learned about slavery in the Americas through not only the white men who enslaved Africans, but through their wives who conspired with them and the enslaved Black women as well.

 

In this collection, I have the simplified imagining of enslavement: The continent of Africa, the boat diagrams of how enslaved people were held, the coffle and lastly, cultivating sugar, one of the most lucrative and strenuous labors of slavery. The “mask” is both tribute to the song by Atlanta rapper Future, as well as the idea that there was a sort covering done to Black women and their brutal experience of slavery. Images that are often used to illustrate slavery are now painted over the women that are forgotten. They stare at the viewer, hold their gaze and insist that a conversation be had.